Protestant reformation primarily economic event

Politically, the rejection of the authority of the Catholic Church concinced many states to join the Reformation, and the Anglican reformation was nearly wholly based on political motices.

Indirectly, its original motives were realized through the Catholic Counter-Reformation.

“The Protestant Reformation was primarily an economic event.” Defend or refute?

Negatively, however, persecutions of Protestant sects persisted for many years causing thousands of people to flee their homelands in search of religious freedom. Also, in the Address to the Nobility of the German Nation, Martin Luther cited the Pope's claim to be the only one who could interpret scripture.

However, the issues of the Reformation were based on religious problems. Increasingly, one could buy titles of significance in the Church while it was nobles who were usually the officials selected to fill the highest positions such as cardinals.

The Anabaptists were a group of laborers who were adversely affected by the economic change of the age. The spread of the Reformation itself was supported by the printers' guilds, who stood to profit from the production of propaganda.

Followers of the Devotio Moderna, or Modern Devotion, held the view that traditional beliefs should be de-emphasized in favor of a more direct and personal approach to religion. Overall, the Protestant Reformation opened new avenues of thought and prepared Europe for even more changes that were soon to come.

The Protestant Reformation Was Primarily an Economic Event

However these motives could have easily been done away with and the Reformation would have lived on. Because the economic prosperity of the the late 15th and 16th centuries did not directly affect the lower class, who were kept in submission by lords and extreme taxation, the peasants embraced new forms of religion.

Therefore, the Protestant Reformation was not primarily an economic event, it was a religiuous one. Economic motives were certainly the weakest. At its heart, the Protestant Reformation as a whole was primarily a religious event, not an economic one. Because the economic prosperity of the the late 15th and 16th centuries did not directly affect the lower class, who were kept in submission by lords and extreme taxation, the peasants embraced new forms of religion.

This meant that he, in essence, had universal temporal authority over all secular rulers and their people, "Indeed, we declare, announce and define, that it is altogether necessary to salvation for every human creature to be subject to the Roman pontiff" In the end, the forces that most contributed to the Reformation were those that started it: The abuse that the population could already see in the form of the sale of indulgences and the general state of the clergy allowed these ideas to catch quickly.

External forces also affected the strggle.

The Protestant Reformation… an Economic Event???

They were continually subjected to new taxes to benefit the Pope and Rome, and were threatened with excommunication and certain damnation if they resisted.

However, it was the religious motive behind the Reformation that gave it such power. The economy of the time was a hard mix of prosperity among the upper and middle classes, and extreme poverty throughout the majority of the land and peasants. Because France was involved in a war with Charles V, the French kings sought to use Protestantism to further splinter the German territories, weakening Charles V.

From the problems with the sales of indulgences, to arguments over the validity of each of the sacraments, to the debate over who had authority in religious issues, what sparked the Reformation were issues of faith, not money or power.

Politics, economics and religion all played a part in propelling the Protestant Reformation forward. In the end, the forces that most contributed to the Reformation were those that started it - the religious arguments over the abusive practices the Church had developed.

Martin Luther, however, contested that there was biblical reference neither to indulgences nor to purgatory. The Protestant Reformation was primarily a religious event, not an economic one. However, there were several economic motives that allowed the Reformation to spread, such as the confiscation of church lands, these were relatively unimportant in.

The Protestant Reformation was a 16th century movement originally aimed at reforming the Catholic Church. Indirectly, its original motives were realized through the Catholic Counter-Reformation. However, the Protestant Reformation soon sought to break away from the Catholic Church for a variety of different reasons.

"The Protestant Reformation Was Primarily an Economic Event." by Describing and Determining the Relative Importance of the Economic, Political, and Religious Causes of the Protestant Reformation, Defend or Refute This Statement. The Protestant Reformation was a 16th century movement originally aimed at reforming the Catholic Church.

Indirectly, its original motives were realized through the Catholic Counter-Reformation. However, the Protestant Reformation soon sought to break away. The protestant reformation was primarily an economic event because the entire idea of reforming the church started with the validity of the sale of indulgences.

Indulgences were purely for economic gain when it came to the catholic church.

The Reformation

The Protestant Reformation was primarily a religious event, not an economic one. However, there were several economic motives that allowed the Reformation to spread, such as the confiscation of church lands, these were relatively unimportant in view of the other motive.

Protestant reformation primarily economic event
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The Protestant Reformation Was Primarily an Economic Event - Sample Essays